1557

30th. September Thursday
The bakers having taken their stand to sell bread in a situation that was  deemed inconvenient, it was ordered that when they appeared in the forbidden spot a pennyworth of bread should be taken from each of them and given to the poor. 30th September. (Earwaker’s Records.)(7)

1557
George Colliar, warden, died, of whom it is stated by Fox, the martyrologist, that although a rigid Catholic, “he does not appear to have aided persecution.” (7)

1557
Lawrence Vaux, B.D., appointed warden, but opposing the Reformation was deprived by Queen Elizabeth. He was a strenuous Catholic, so wonderful,” says Hollinworth, “did God hide his people in Lancashire.” His example and influence appear to have opposed a powerful obstacle to the reception of the reformed religion in this county. He was born at Blackrod, near Chorley, ‘and was a laborious, learned, and devout divine; but for his adherence to the Catholic faith was cast into prison, in London, where he is believed to have died in great necessity. He was the author of a Catechisme, published at Antwerp in 1573, which has been reprinted by the Chetham Society, with a biographical notice by Mr. T. G. Law. The testimony of Hollinworth, who was a hearty hater of Rome, is that “he was laborious, learned, and in his way devout and conscientious.” Further, “he was a man well beloved and highly honoured by many in Manchester; yea, by the generality.” (7)

1557
Henry Pendleton, D.D;, died circa 1557. He was born at Manchester about 1521, and was the author of two of the homilies and other writings. He was one of those who attempted to reconcile Bradford to the Church of Rome, having been himself a stout Protestant in King Edward’s days.(7)