1586

1586
Hollinworth states that “there was a greate dearth in this country, insomuch that in Manchester, a peny white loafe weighed but six or eight ounces, one peny boulted bread ten or eleven ounces, ryebread ten ounces, browne bread, about foureteene ounces; and the Bishop of Chester and others pitying the condicion of the poore, did order that the peny white bread should weigh nine ounces of troy weight; boulted bread, ten; browns bread, fifteene; jannocke, thirteene; oate cake, fifteene ounces. That euery baker haue his marke, according to the statute; that their bread bee wholesome and wel baked; that they sell but onely twelve to the dozen; that no loaves bee made, but either of jd., ijd., iiljd., at the farthest; that these orders bee duely observed, both by inhabitants and forreiners.”(7)

1586
Camden describes Manchester as surpassing the neighbouring towns in elegance and populousness. “There is,” says he, “a woollen manufacture, a market, a church, and a college.”(7)

1586
The Court Leet records contain the following memorandum, circa, 1586 :- “That holle fiftene of the said town of Manchester and the hamell or hamella [hamlet] de Bulhangs [?]  due to the Queen’s majesty, at every holle fiftene granted, ys the some of Thre powndes Seyven shyllynges.” (Harland’s Court Leet Records, vol i., p. 167.)(7)