1588

15th. March Friday
A letter was sent 15th March from two justices at Lancaster Assizes— Clenche and Rodes—to the deputy-lieutenants, directing them to inquire as to the too great number of bakers and alehouse-keepers in Manchester, and to suppress such as were not needed.(7)

April
There died of the parishioners in one moneth of Aprill, neere seventy persons.” (Hollinworth.)(7)

3rd. October Thursday
The Court Leet jury ordered that no person should be allowed to buy any fruit before nine o’clock in the forenoon; if any were bought they were not to sell the same day under a fine of 2s. October 3. (Harland’s Court Leet.)(7)

1588
A great panic in Manchester, caused by a rumour that a large army of Papists had actually marched as far as Swinton Moor to attack the town. The townspeople “betook themselves to such armes as they had,” and Bishop Chaderton, who was then Warden, caused the flesh shambles to be removed to Salford Bridge. (Hollinworth’s Mancuniensis.)(7)

1588
Printing was introduced into Manchester by itinerant printers, who in the interests of Puritanism issued fierce attacks upon the bishops from secret presses, first at Kingston in Surrey, then at Fawsley in Northamptonshire, and then at Newton Lane, Manchester, where printers and press were seized by Fernando, fifth Earl of Derby. The mystery attaching to the Martin Marprelate tracts has never been fully cleared. “Ha’ ye any work for the Cooper?” had appeared, and at Manchester they were printing “Ha’ ye any more work for the Cooper?” No copies of the sheets actually printed off appear to have been preserved. (See Notes and Queries, 4th Series, iii., 97, and vii., 64; and Axon’s Manchester Libraries.)(7)

1588
Against the Spanish Armada, Manchester was required to contribute 38 narquebusiers, 38 archers, and 144 men for bills and pikes. The county 2,375 men.(7)

1588
In the charter granted by Queen Elizabeth to the Collegiate Church, the Manchester population is stated at 10,000, but whether this means the town or the parish is not certain.(7)