1590

April
The Lord visited the town with a sore pestilence; there died of the parishioners, in one monthe of Aprill, near seventy persons.” (Hollinworth’s Mancuniensis.)(7)

1590
A commission held in Manchester for the punishment of Popish recusants.(7)

1590
Chorlton Hall demised by Edmund Trafford, Esq., to Ralph Sorocold for £320. It was the seat of the Minshulls, or Mynsales, in the reign of Henry I.; and in 1544 it was sold by Ellis Hey of Monks Hall, in Eccles to Thomas Minshull, apothecary, in Manchester, for £300; but it is reported to have been sold at a later period for £60,000 or £70,000.(7)

1590
Sir Edmund Trafford the fourth died. He was born in 1526. His first wife was a sister of Queen Catharine Howard, his second a daughter of Ralph Leicester, of Toft. He was a staunch Protestant, and is credited with special activity against the partisans of the old faith. Sir Edmund was High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1565, 1571, and 1580.(7)

1590
John Piers, Archbishop of York held a visitation of the diocese of Chester in the church of Manchester on the last day of May, when the Fellows of the College were admonished for not using the surplice The correspondence which followed is printed in Chetham Miscellany vol v.(7)

1590
A document signed by Peter Shaw, Oliver Carter, and other preachers gives an account of the state, civil and ecclesiastical, of the county, in which they complain of the presence of Jesuits and priests, daily masses, private marriages, old festivals and fasts observed, fairs, markets, mayames, &c., held on the Sabbath, unruly behaviour in church, “popish superstition used in the burial of the dead,” corruption in churchwardens, sidesmen, and parish clerks; inconvenient state of churches and chapels, contentions about seats, and other matters. (Chetham’s Miscellany, vol. v.)(7)