1608

11th. April Monday
William Chadderton, D.D., Bishop of Lincoln, and late Warden of Manchester, died at Southoe, Hunts, 11th April. He was born at Nuthurst, and educated at Cambridge, where he was Regius Professor. He was favourable to Puritanism, but was placed in power by Queen Elizabeth as a check upon the Romanists, who were strong in the north. He removed his residence from Chester to Manchester, and with the Earl of Derby, who was then frequently resident at Aldport, exercised great authority as joint commissioners for promoting the reformation. The bishop had a sort of council of ministers, and daily morning and evening lectures and monthly exercises were set on foot. (Woods’ Athen., Oxon, vol ii, p. 482; Peck’s Desiderata Curiosa.)(7)

1608
John Dee, M.A., Warden of the Collegiate Church, died at his residence, at Mortlake, in Surrey, in the utmost poverty, aged 81 years. He was born in London, July 13, 1527. He was celebrated for his learning and for his interest in the occult sciences. A folio volume published in 1659 by Meric Casaubon­chronicles his intercourse with the world of spirits. His Diary has been printed by the Camden Society, but somewhat inaccurately, and the portions relating to Manchester have been carefully re-edited by Mr. J. E. Bailey. His autobiographical tracts have been reprinted by the Chetham Society. His mathematical and philosophical tracts are exceedingly rare and sometimes very obscure. It is thought that during his continental travels he was in the employment of the Queen, and sent home intelligence of what he learned abroad.(7)

1608
Richard Murray, DD, rector of Stopford (Stockport) and Dean of St. Buriens, in Cornwall, appointed warden. The story of this remarkable man is thus told by Hollinworth :—
“After the death of Dr. Dee, the sayd William Bourne being as was sayd,an approoued divine, and having allso married a kinswoman of the Cecylls Lords Burgley, was in a faire likelyhood of being warden, and had a grant for it, but hee was hindred, partly by his nonconformity (onely a lease of tythes for three lives of about thirty pounds per annum was given him), and partly by the potency of some Scottish lords at court, which got the wardenship for Richard Murray, D.D., who was likewise Parson of Stockport, Deane of St. Buriens, in Cornewall, and had some civill honors descending to him by in­heritance from his Scottish ancestors—one of honorable descent, competently learned, zealous for the dignity of his place as warden, but not laudable otherwayes. Hee seldome preached—onely twise in Manchester—once in Gen. i. 1 In the beginning, &c. Another time in Rev. xxii. 20; Come, Lord Jesus, &c. So it was sayd that hee in preaching begunne and ended the bible, nor was hee verry skillfull in it. Preaching once before King James vppon Rom i. 16; I am not ashamed of the gospell of Christ. When hee came to kisse the King’s hand, his Majesty sayd, Thou art not ashamed of the gospell of Christ, but by ------ , the gospell of Christ may bee ashamed of thee! Hee was a greate Pluralist, and yet was a mighty hunter of other Ecclesiasticall dignityes and benefices. Hee was very jealous of being poysoned by his servants, if they were discontented at him: hee make them tast before he would cate or drinke. When hee was abroad, he liued very obscurely, lodging rarely in the best innes, or two journeyes together in the same inne; but at Manchester hee liued in greater state, accounted himselfe (as indeed by his place he was) the best man in the parish, Hee required the fellowes, chaplaines, singing men, choristers to goe before him to church, and some gentlemen followed after: hee demaunded his seate from the Bishop of Chester when hee was sett In it, saying, My Lord, that seate belongs to the warden; and because hee would not sitt below the bishop, hee remooued in to the body of the church, and in the afternoone hee came timely enough to take his owne seate, and so the bishop was forced to seek another seate. In his time the Quire part of the church grew very ruinous, the revennues of the Colledge were leased out by his meanes. Hee purposely abstained from taking the oath mencioned in the Queene’s letters patents, concerning his not receiuing of the Colledge revenues, saue for the dayes in which hee did resyde. The fellow­ships and other places were either not furnished with men, or the men with meanes, herevppou many and grieuous complaints were made by the parishioners against him to King Charles, who comitted the whole matter to William, Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Lord Coventry, of Alsbrough, Lord Keeper of the Greate Seale; Henry, Earle of Manchester, Lord Keeper of the Privy Seale, that they might enquire further into the matter. Afterward hee comitted it to the examination of Commissioners, in causes ecclesiasticall, which after mature deliberation and examination, proceeding in due forme of law, and having summoned the sayd Richard Murray, personally to answer for himselfe, did not onely remooue the sayd warden from his place, but pronounced him to have bin no warden from the first, and that the colledge had either a weake foundation or none at all.”
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