1632

1632
Daniel Baker, M.A., rector of Assheton-on-Mercy Banke, and Fellow of the Colledge, having on Good Friday (as it is called) administered the Lord’s Supper, and being (as it is feared) somewhat overcharged with drinke, in Salford, was found dead in the morning in the water under Salford Bridge. Whether hee fell downe of himselfe, being a tall man, and the battlements then but low, or whether hee was cast downe or put over the bridge, is not certainely knowne to this day.” (Hollinworth’s Mancuniensis.)(7)

1632
Sir Cecil Trafford abjured the reformed faith, and became a Roman Catholic. He had been a great persecutor of the recusant Catholics. In his zeal for the reformed religion he attempted to convert a kinsman, Francis Downes, of Wardley, but the fresh consideration of the controversy between the Anglican and Roman Churches led him to join the communion of the latter.(7)

1632
A paper fixed upon the south door of the Collegiate Church with shoemaker’s wax. It was taken down by the churchwardens, who sent a copy to London, which is preserved in the Harleian MS. 2176, f. 7. It is obscurely worded, but appears to be a Puritan incitement to insurrection. Mr. J. P. Rylands regards it as an evidence that “the idea of taking away the King’s life existed in some minds at least seventeen years before he was brought to trial.” (See Baines’ Lancashire, old ed., and Palatine Note-book, vol. i., p. 89.) The MS. was endorsed by some official “A peece of Paracelsus his plaster, or a little melancholike treason extracted from a distracted and simple soul.’(7)