1641

10th. September Friday Lancaster-Manchester-Barlow
Edward Barlow, Roman Catholic priest (Father Ambrose, O.S.B.), executed as a recusant, at Lancaster, September 10th. He was born at Manchester in 1585, and was son of Alexander Barlow of Barlow. He was educated at Douay and Valladolid. He was sent as a mission priest, and for twenty-four years laboured chiefly in his native county, where he was revered by those of his own faith for the sanctity of his life. He was arrested on Easter day by a minister and his congregation who left their own service to hunt the priest. He was tried at Lancaster Assizes for recusancy, and was executed September 10. Some curious extracts from a letter to his brother, Dr. Rudesind Barlow, are given in Challoner’s Missionary Priests.(7)

1641. Manchester
An interesting reference to vegetable cotton, the soft substance forming the covering or envelope of the seeds of the gossypium, or cotton plant, as an article used in manufacture, appears in a small treatise published at London in 1641, entitled “The Treasure of Traffic,” written by Lewis Roberts, who says that “the town of Manchester buys the linen yarn of the Irish in great quantity, and, weaving it, returns the same again to Ireland to sell. Neither doth her industry rest here, for they buy cotton wool in London, that comes from Cyprus and Smyrna, and work the same into fustians, vermilions, dimities, and other such stuffs, which they return to London, where they are sold; and thence not seldom are sent into foreign parts, which have means on far easier terms to provide themselves of the first material.”(7)

1641. Manchester
The news of the so-called Irish Massacre excited almost consternation, and the Lancashire Protestants were afraid of similar trouble at home, where the Roman Catholics were very numerous. Application was made to Lord Strange, the lord-lieutenant, for arms and ammunition. Magazines were formed in various parts of the county, and at Manchester a room of the college was set apart and stocked with ten barrels of gunpowder and a proportionate quantity of match.(7)

1641.
Robert Lever founded the Bolton Free Grammar School.
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1641.
The last of Radcliffes in direct line died; he was 6th Earl of Sussex.
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1641. Heaton Park-Bury-Manchester
Rev. Richard Wroe, the "Silver-tongued," warden of Manchester Collegiate Church, born at Heaton Gate, Prestwich. Heaton Gate was situated about 450 yards south of the present Heaton House in Heaton Park. Dr. Wroe became warden of Manchester in 1684, died 1718. He was educated at Bury Grammer School.
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