1643

12th. January Thursday
Manchester was made the headquarters of the Parliamentary army, under Sir Thomas Fairfax, January 12, who remained there till the 21st, when, with 2,500 foot and 28 troops of horse, he marched to the relief of Northwich.(7)

10th. February Friday
Sir John Seaton, a Scottish knight, major-general of the Parliament’s forces in Lancashire, made Manchester his headquarters, and, attended by Colonel Holland, Captain Booth, Sergeant-Majors Birch and Sparrow, with three companies of foot, marched from Manchester to besiege Preston, Feb. 10, which town surrendered after two hours’ fighting. Captain Booth was the first to scale the walls, with the cry of “Follow me, or give me up for ever.” The three Manchester troops “distinguished themselves eminently.” A ship with supplies for the King was wrecked on the sands and the stores seized by the Roundheads.(7)

July
The Earl of Newcastle, when at Bradford in July, as the King’s general, proposed to the town terms of surrender, but the proposal was firmly rejected. The Earl, finding that nothing was to be gained, took another route and went to Hull, and thus put an end to the military affairs of the place. July.(7)

1643
William Bourne, B.D., Fellow of the Collegiate Church, died. He was a native of Staffordshire and a graduate of St. John’s College, Cambridge. He was an earnest, pious, and learned Puritan, and was exceedingly popular with the parishioners. (See Hollinworth’s Mancuniensis and Halley’s Lancashire.)(7)

1643
He had a controversy in 1631 with Richard Johnson, another Fellow of the Collegiate Church, as to the nature of sin. In consequence, a Roman Catholic priest published a tract against both disputants, which was answered by Hollinworth.(7)

1643
Master John Shawe appointed to preach every Friday. The town then contained many Puritan fugitives. Shawe was promised £50, but “never got a penny.” Shawe was at this time vicar of Lymme, and has left a very curious autobiography. (Memoirs of Mr. John Shawe, edited by Rev. J. B. Boyle, Hull, 1882; Axon’s Lancashire Gleanings.)(7)