1657   

11th. January Sunday
The Censures of the Church Revived published. It is signed "John Harrison, Moderator," and dated Manchester, January 11, 1658. It is a defence of the Presbyterian Classis and its jurisdiction in the controversy with Rev. Isaac Allen, minister of Prestwich, who strenuously objected to the eldership and retained as much as he could of the forms of the Episcopal Church. (Halley's Lancashire, p. 303; Baker's Memorials, p. 136)(7)

1657
George Fox again visited Manchester, and as the sessions were being held, many country people were in town. Fox was assailed in the meeting with clods and stones, and finally he was taken into custody by the peace officers and brought before the magistrates, whom he rebuked, and was allowed to depart on the following day. "The Lord hath since raised up a people in the town to stand for His Name and truth over those shabby professors." (Fox's Journal.)(7)

1657
Sir Edward Mosley, lord of the manor, died. He was born in 1615, and was an ardent Royalist, and in 1640 received a baronetcy from Charles I. In 1642 he was High Sheriff of Staffordshire. During the siege of Manchester his house (Alport Lodge) was burned down. He is said to have spent 20,000 in the Cavalier cause. He was one of the Royalist prisoners captured at Middlewich by Brereton. His estate was sequestered, a fine of a tenth, amounting to 4,874, was levied. He was tried upon a capital charge brought against him by a woman, but was acquitted. He was succeeded by his son Sir Edward. (Mosley's Family Memoirs.)(7)