1690       

1690
“About the year 1690, the manufacturers and traders having accumulated capital, began to build modern brick houses in place of those of wood and plaster, which had prevailed so generally since the former era of improvement, in the reign of Elizabeth. The manufacturers, even those in an extensive line of business, who took apprentices from amongst the sons of the respectable families in the neighbourhood, used to be in their warehouses before six o’clock in the morning, accompanied by their children of sufficient age, and by their apprentices. At seven they returned to breakfast, which consisted of one large dish of water-porridge poured into a bowl, at the side of which stood an equally capacious bason of milk, and the master and apprentices, each with a wooden spoon in his hand, without loss of time, and without ceremony, dipped into the bowl, and then into the milk-bason; and as soon as the mess was finished they all returned to their work. Though our ancestors were watchful over the expenditure of the living, there was a great deal of cost in the interment of the dead. In Warden Wroe’s time, these funeral expenses were carried to a great extent; but the warden, by the exercise of his influence, prevailed upon the inhabitants to apply the money usually spent in this way for the relief of the poor, and in some years there was a sum accumulated to the amount of nearly £800.”(7)

1690
This year is memorable in the annals of the Free Grammar School for a juvenile rebellion which broke out upon some cause of discontent, and lasted for a fortnight; during which time the young insurgents, who had taken possession of the school, to the exclusion of the masters, were supplied by some of the inhabitants with beds and victuals, as well as with firearms and ammunition, but in the end were compelled to surrender.(7)