1695       

17th. September Tuesday
Rev. Henry Newcome, M.A., died 17th September. This learned and pious divine was the son of a clergyman in Huntingdonshire. His mother was one of the Salford family of Williamson. In 1644 he entered St. Johnís College, Cambridge, and after taking his B.A. degree, married, about the age of 20, Elizabeth Mainwaring, and through her interest became rector of Gawsworth in 1650, and in 1655 was chosen as successor of Hollinworth in the Collegiate Church. He is often called Fellow, but there was no Chapter, as the church revenue was sequestered and the college practically dissolved. He was favourable to the Restoration, and preached a sermon Usurpation Defeated and David Restored, 1660. The new charter of Charles II. did not name him, but he was allowed to preach until 31st August, 1662. He continued in Manchester until the passing of the infamous Five Mile Act in 1665, when he was forced to remove to Worsley, but in 1670 again came to live in the town, and, after some persecution, obtained a licence in 1672 to preach in his own house or adjacent barn in the Cold House. This had to he discontinued in 1676, but he still taught in the homes of his adherents, and in 1687 began again to preach publicly. Amongst the smaller annoyances was the breaking of the windows of the barn chapel by Sir John Bland whilst Newcome was preaching. In 1693 the Cross Street Chapel was erected, and the Revolution having given the Non≠conformists some peace, the last days of Newcome were not made bitter by persecution. He wrote The Sinnerís Hope, 1660; Plain Discourse about Rash and Sinful Anger, 1693, and other works. His Diary has been edited by Thomas Heywood, F.S.A., and his Autobiography by Rev. Richard Parkinson, and both published by the Chetham Society. He is buried in the aisle of Cross Street Chapel. There is a portrait of this founder of Manchester Nonconformity in the Lancashire Independent College, which is engraved in the Manchester Socinian Controversy and in Sir Thomas Bakerís Memorials of Cross Street Chapel, where there is a full list of his writings.(7)

1695
From an indenture made of this year it would appear that the fee with an apprentice to a Manchester manufacturer was £60, the youth serving seven years.(7)