1745       

18th. April Thursday
John Kay and Joseph Stell invented “a loom for working and weaving of tapes, &c.” April 18.(7)

1745
In Marchant’s History of the Rebellion, he says: “Manchester stands near the conflux of the Irk with the Irwell, and is so much improved in this and the last century above its neighbours, that though it is not a corporation, nor sends members to Parliament, yet, as an inland town, it has perhaps the best trade of any in these north parts, and surpasses all the towns hereabouts in buildings and number of people, and its spacious market-place and college.(7)

1745
. . . . . The fustian manufactures, called Manchester cottons, for which it has been famous for almost one hundred and fifty years, have been very much improved of late by some inventions of dyeing and printing with the great variety of other manufactures, known by the name of Manchester goods, as ticking, tapes, filleting, and linen cloth, enrich not only the town but the whole parish, and render the people industrious. As the Hague in Holland is deservedly called the most magnificent village in Europe, Manchester, with equal propriety, may be styled the greatest mere village in England, for ‘tis not so much as a town, strictly speaking, the highest magistrate being a constable or headborough; yet it is more populous than York, Norwich, or most cities in England, and as big as two or three of the lesser ones put together.”(7)

November
The “rising of the forty-five” was a memorable event in the annals of Manchester, where the adherents of the Stuarts were very numerous. It was the custom of the leaders to dine together at a small public-house near Didsbury. After the cloth was removed a large bowl of water was placed on the table, when every gentleman rose, and holding his glass over the water drank “The King.” “This is not a toast I should have expected to be drunk here,” said a new guest. “Tush,” said his friend, “are we not drinking ‘The King over the water?’” On the news of the insurrection in Scotland a subscription amounting to £1,966 3s. was raised for a troop to be placed at the disposal of Edward Lord Derby for resisting the army of the young Pretender. Warden Peploe was the only subscriber amongst the clergy of the Collegiate Church. The Stuart partizans included some of the leading gentlemen of the town, the clergy of the Collegiate Church, nearly all of whom, except Dr. Peploe (who laboured singly and unceasingly in defence of George II.), were zealous Jacobites, and took every occasion to promote disaffection from the pulpit, and to influence their hearers on behalf of the Pretender; and lastly, Dr. Deacon and his band of Nonjurors, who was decidedly the most active in the insurrection, and whose three sons joined the Pretender. Corporal Dickson and his sweetheart, with a drummer belonging to the Pretender’s army, took military possession of Manchester, November 28. A party of the inhabitants resolved upon “taking him prisoner, dead or alive.” A fight ensued, the issue of which was that, the Jacobite party defending Dickson and the drummer, the assailants were repulsed, and during the rest of the day they paraded the streets in triumph, and obtained about one hundred and eighty recruits, to don white cockades. In the evening the vanguard of the army entered the town, and the main body, under the command of Prince Charles Edward (the young Pretender), began to enter Manchester about ten o’clock in the morning, November 29. The troops marched into St. Ann’s Square whilst the funeral service was being performed over the grave of the Rev. Joseph Hoole. Some of the officers joined decorously in the service. The Prince arrived about two in the afternoon, and took up his residence at the house of Mr. John Dickenson, in Market Street Lane, afterwards known as the Palace Inn, and now the Palace Buildings. The Prince, in marching through Salford, was met by the Rev. John Clayton, who, falling on his knees, prayed for the divine blessing upon him. The Old Pretender was proclaimed as James III., and there were public illuminations, November 29. Some of the adherents of the Prince went to the printing office of Mr. Whitworth, proprietor of the Magazine, and compelled Thomas Bradbury, a journeyman (in the absence of his master), to print several manifestoes and other papers. The Prince went to service on the Sunday at the Collegiate Church. The sermon was preached by Thomas Cappock, whom the Prince had appointed his chaplain, November 30. After service the “Manchester Regiment,” which numbered about 300 men, was reviewed by the Prince Charles Edward in the Churchyard. The rebels left the town on their march to the South, 1st December. They marched to Derby, where a retreat was decided upon, and the rebel army re-entered on their retreat to the North, December 8. The Pretender levied a contribution of £5,000 upon the inhabitants of Manchester, and took old James Bayley prisoner, but let him go on condition that he would raise one-half of the money, or surrender himself again a prisoner. He went to the Old Coffee House, and it was arranged that he and John Dickenson should give promissory notes, payable in three months, to such persons as would advance them money to meet the demand. By this method the £2,500 was paid within the specified time, December 10. At the surrender of Carlisle to the Duke of Cumberland, December 24, the following officers of the Manchester Regiment fell into the hands of the Royalists: Colonel Francis Townley; Captains James Dawson, George Fletcher, John Sanderson, Peter Moss, Andrew Blood, David Morgan; Lieutenants T. Deacon, Robert Deacon, Thomas Chadwick, John Beswick, John Holker, Thomas Furnival; Ensigns Charles Deacon, Samuel Maddock, Charles Gaylor, James Wilding, John Hunter, John Brettagh; Adjutant Syddall, and Thomas Cappock. Of the non-commissioned officers and privates there were only ninety-three remaining. The officers were sent in waggons to London, and the subordinates were thrown into the prisons of Carlisle, Penrith, and Kendal. Before they were marched to the metropolis the former were coufined in the town gaol, and the privates in the cathedral of the first-named place. The story of the “forty-five” has given rise to a considerable literature. The local details are given in Byrom’s Diary, and the Foundations of Manchester. Various depositions as to the behaviour of the rebels in Manchester and the neighbourhood are printed, with annotations by Mr. J. P. Earwaker, in the Palatine Note-book, vol. iii., p. 70. See also an artIcle by Sir Thomas Baker in the Palatine Note-book, vol. iii., p. 19. There is a MS. diary of a Manchester man who was in the Pretender’s army, and taken prisoner at Carlisle. It is in Chetham’s library. It is sometimes styled James Miller’s journal, but the question of its authorship is discussed in The Reliquary, April, 1871.(7)

27th November Wednesday
Rev. Joseph Hoole, M.A., died November 27. He was educated at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, and had been vicar of Haxey before his appointment as rector of St. Ann’s in 1736. He wrote a Guide to Communicants, 1739. He was buried at St. Ann’s, 29th November, and some of the Jacobite rebel officers joined in the funeral service. Mr. Hoole’s Sermons were published in 1747. (Bardsley’s Memorials.)(7)

1745
Kersal Moor races were discontinued probably through the influence of John Byrom.(7)