1763       

4th. September Sunday
The parish registers record the baptism of John, son of William Jordan, callique printer, of Little Green, September 4th. This Mr. Jordan is said to have been the first calico printer in the district. A notice of his house and descendants is given in the Palatine Note-book, vol. iv., p. 140.(7)

26. September Monday
John Byrom, M.A., F.R.S., died September 26. He was born at Kersal in 1691. His father, a linen draper of Manchester, sent him to Cambridge, where he graduated M.A. and became Fellow of Trinity College; but declining to take orders he resigned this provision, and soon after married his cousin, Miss Elizabeth Byrom, against the consent of both families. Being without a profession, and pressed by the res angustæ domi, he repaired to the metropolis, and supported himself by teaching shorthand, of which he had invented the best system then before the public. In 1723 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and in the following year he succeeded, by the death of his elder brother, to the family estate, when he returned to Manchester, where he remained till his death. Byrom was a mystic, but a man of wit as well as virtue. Two posthumous editions of his Poems have appeared, and they are also included in Chalmers’s collection of the English Poets. Byrom is comparatively unknown at the present day, but his Colin and Phoebe was once one of the most popular pieces in the language, and his carol of Christians, Awake! is still so. His diary, written in his own shorthand, has been deciphered and published by the Chetham Society, and is valuable for its local information and for the glimpses it gives of the literary life of London and Cambridge in the early part of last century.(7)

28th. October Friday
The Rev. Charles Downes, fellow of the Collegiate Church, died October 28.(7)

13th. December Tuesday
“Last week a very curious and elegant clock, made by Mr. Hindley, of York, was compleatly finished and affixed in our collegiate church. It is allowed, by all judges, to be the best constructed thing of the kind ever seen in this country, and gives great satisfaction to the whole parish.” (Harrop’s Mercury, Dec. 13.) (7)

1763
Mr. Thomas Percival died at Royton Hall. He was born at Royton Hall, 1st September, 1719. He was the author of A Letter occasioned by the late Disputes betwixt the Check-Makers of Manchester and their Weavers, Halifax, 1759; and was probably the author of A Letter to the Clergy of Manchester occasioned by Mr. Owen’s Remarks on Deacon, etc., 1748. His genealogical and antiquarian papers remain in MS. (7)

1763
The Lancashire Magazine was published and printed by T. Anderton, at the Shakspere’s Head, near the Market Cross.(7)

1763
Buildings were erected as a workhouse in Miller’s Lane, and also a prison, but were eventually taken down.(7)

1763
A project which was called the “Chorlton Rant” suggested that Manchester should be a borough, under a royal charter. It was proposed that the corporation should consist of one-third of High Churchmen, one-third of Low Churchmen, and the other third of Protestant Dissenters. But the High Churchmen anticipating a union of the other two-thirds, and “not liking that the mace should be taken on Sunday to a conventicle,” opposed the bill, and celebrated their success with great exultation. This victory of party spirit was a misfortune for the town, which had now outgrown its antiquated form of local government.(7)

1763
Bleaching was generally introduced into the district about this date.(7)

1763
The first spinning jenny is said to have been constructed by Thomas Highs, a reed maker, at Leigh, and so named after his beloved and favourite daughter, Jane. There has been much controversy as to the origin of the various cotton machines. (Espinasse’s Lancashire Worthies).(7)

1763
In this year only eight flats (vessels so called) were employed in the trade between Manchester and Liverpool.(7)

1763
The trust deed for the Wesleyan Chapel in Manchester provided that “during their lifetime Wesley, his brother, and Grimshaw, of Haworth, and others should have the use of the said chapel; and that, after their death, the trustees should permit such persons to preach in it as were appointed by the yearly conference, provided always that such persons preach no other doctrine than is contained in Wesley’s Notes upon the New Testament, and his four volumes of sermons; and provided also that they preach evenings in the week, and at five o’clock on each morning following.” (Tyerman’s Life of Wesley, vol. ii., p. 478.)(7)

1763
British muslins, both striped and plain, were first manufactured by Mr. Shaw, at Anderton, near Chorley, though with small success, from the deficient supply of yarn.(7)

1763
The first cotton quiltings were made by Joseph Shaw, of Bolton.(7)