1779       

17th. January Sunday
Mr. Roger Sedgwick, banker, died January 17.(7)

17th. June Thursday
Mr. Philip Brown, M.D., died at his house in Marsden Square, June 17. (7)

1st. July Thursday
Mr. Humphrey Trafford, of Trafford, died at York, July 1, and the estates passed to the Traffords of Croston.(7)

23rd. September Thursday
The Rev. Sir John Mosley, third baronet, lord of the manor, died 23rd September, and with him the baronetcy became extinct. He was a man of very eccentric habits, and owing to an early disappointment in love had so great an aversion to womankind that his orders to his housekeeper were given through a grated partition. (Mosley’s Family Memoirs; Axon’s Lancashire Gleanings.) He was succeeded by John Parker Mosley. (See under date 1798.) (7)

9th. October Saturday
Serious riots occurred in Manchester, and throughout Lancashire, on the introduction of machinery for spinning, October 9. The riots were continued during the following year.(7)

1779
Mr. Samuel Crompton, of Hall-i’th’-Wood, near Bolton, invented a combination of the jenny and the water-frame, called a mule, for spinning, which he gave to the public. (7)

1779
Rev. Robert Gore died at the age of 31. He was a native of Liverpool, and in 1770 became minister of Cross Street Chapel. He was buried in the vestibule of the chapel. (Baker’s Memorials, p. 47.)(7)

1779
There was only one stage coach each week from Manchester to London, and one to Liverpool twice a week.(7)

1779
The Manchester and Liverpool Museum; or, The Beauties of all the Magazines Selected, is the title of a periodical printed by and for T. Jefferson, Manchester, and issued monthly.(7)

1779
The publication of a satirical work, entitled Characteristic Strictures; or, Upwards of One Hundred of the Principal Portraits in Manchester, &c., gave offence to many who were lampooned. The book was anonymous, but the author was the Rev. Thomas Seddon. (See under date 1796.)(7)

1779
Sir Thomas Egerton, of Heaton Park, raised, at his own expense, a regiment of 400 men, who were called the Royal Lancashire Volunteers. (7)