923       

923
"In this year," says the Saxon Chronicle "after harvest, King Edward went with his forces to Thelwall, and commanded the town to be built, and occupied, and manned; and commanded another force also of Mercians, the while that he sat there, to take possession of Manchester, in Northumbria, and repair and man it." There has been some controversy as to whether Manchester was included in the kingdom of Mercia or in that of Northumbria. Whitaker maintains that it was part of Mercia, but the passage in the Saxon Chronicle seems good evidence to the contrary. It is clear also from this entry that Manchester suffered from the Danes, but the bloodshed and suffering caused by their incursions have remained unchronicled.(7)

923
At this time, in the opinion of Baines, the town of Manchester extended from the confluence of the Medlock with the Irwell to the confluence of the Irk with the same river; in other terms, from the Castlefleld to the college (Chetham's Hospital); and that Deansgate and St. Mary's-gate formed the principal streets, and Aldpark the vill precinct. In addition to the mill near the Roman castrum, another was built on the banks of the Irk, where Cateaton Street now stands, and gave the name to Old Millgate, which is to be classed amongst the ancient parts of the town. The market was held in and about Smithy Door, and the wakes were celebrated on St. Michael and St. Mary's days, the former of them along the course of Aldport Lane, and the latter in the area of Acres Field.(7)