HULME

1830

HULME

Hulme, a township in the parish of Manchester, hundred of Salford, adjoining Manchester to the south-east. Inhabitants 4234. Hulme is divided from Manchester by the river Medlock. It is agreeably situated, and contains many excellent houses. Here is a large and handsome barrack, usually occupied by a squadron of horse. St. George's church, erected under the recent acts of parliament, in the florid Gothic style, is an exceedingly beautiful structure. Patron the warden and fellow of Christ Church. On the edge of a shelving bank stands Hulme Hall, an ancient half timbered house, long the seat of the Prestwich family, who ruined their fortunes in the civil wars, by taking the royal side : the last baronet died in absolute poverty. In the reign of William III. Hulme Hall was purchased by Sir Edward Mosley : he left it to his daughter lady Bland, who for many years made it her chief residence. It is now become a part of the Bridgewater Canal property, and is let off to numerous tenants. This ancient mansion is singularly curious and picturesque, but could never have been a convenient dwelling : it has been long in a state of dilapidation.

(3) The New Lancashire Gazetteer or Topographical Dictionary 1830